September Meeting


2019-20 Calendar of Events

September 21st – Daylilies 101 – presented by Frank Almquist
10 am at Cooperative Extension offices

October 19th – daylily hybridizer Dave Mussar

November 16th – TBD will be
held at Cooperative Extension
offices

December 14th
Holiday Party with UNYHS.

January 18th – 1:00 pm at
Library

February 16th – Sunday –
Winter Doldrums Party

March 28th – Meeting at
Capital District Garden and
Flower Show

April 18th – TBD

May 9 or 16th

June 13 or 20th

July 11th – Picnic

August 15th – Big Annual Sale

September 19th – TBD

October 17th – TBD

The Albany Co-Cooperative Ext.
is located at 24 Martin Road,
Voorheesville, NY. 12186.
Meetings begin at 10 am
unless otherwise noted.

The William K Sanford
Town Library is located at
629 Albany Shaker Rd,
Loudonville,NY 12211.

Daylilies in the article are:
Kendra Marie by Mussar, 2015 and Joanne Meyer by Mussar, 2014

The daylily in the heading is
Pink Viper by Mussar, 2014

September Meeting

So you bought bunches of daylilies at our August Sale and planted them in your garden…now what? Frank Almquist will present a Daylilies 101 program at our meeting in September that will answer all your questions on daylilies! Daylilies 101 will give you an in-depth look at daylilies – types, classifications, how they grow and how to take care of them (and what all those letters on the labels mean!).

Our meeting on September 21st will be held at 10 am at the Cooperative Extension offices on Martin Rd., in Voorheesville. Join us for a fun meeting and a look into the secret life of daylilies – bring a friend and a dish to share.

Frank Almquist and his wife, Peggy, are active members of HADS as well as being Master Gardeners in Ulster County for more than ten years. Frank retired from engineering and management positions at IBM in the summer of 1997. He has been active in gardening along with other volunteer activities ever since. Frank and Peggy garden and grow daylilies at their home in Kingston, NY. They have attended many regional and national daylily conventions as well as welcoming people into their garden which is registered as an official Display Garden with the American Hemerocallis Society (AHS).


Sneak Peek at the October Meeting


HADS OFFICERS

Co-Chairs – Bill Wurster
(518) 786-3105 and
Cindi Jones (518) 598-3366
wursterw@verizon.net
cindijones58@gmail.com

Secretary – vacant

Treasurer – Carol Volungus
(518) 383-0447
daylilly@juno.com

Committee Chairs
Programs – Speakers

Debi Chowdhury
debichowdhury@yahoo.com

Historian – vacant

Newsletter Editor
Stephanie Kronau
skronau@nycap.rr.com

Hospitality – Barbara Sander
and Don Constantino
bsander@nycap.rr.com

Sunshine – Debi Chowdhury
debichowdhury@yahoo.com

Babysitter Plants
Frank Almquist
falmquist@hvc.rr.com
and Sharon Gallucci
smgallucci@msn.com

Display Garden
Pat & Don Salhoff
psalhoff@verizon.net

Website – Janet Spychalski
Janet.Spychalski@its.ny.gov

Photographer – Cindi Jones
cindijones58@gmail.com

Membership – Carol Volungus
daylilly@juno.com
4 Applewood Dr.,
Rexford. NY 12148

Publicity – Cathy Fruhauf
cathyfruhauf@hotmail.com

Daylilies in the article are:
Cherry Stripes by Mussar, 2014 and
Dragon Nation by Mussar, 2014

Sneak Peek at the October Meeting

Dave Mussar is a daylily hybridizer in Guelph, Ontario. Next month Dave will be coming to tell us about his daylilies and what characteristics he tries to bring out in his hybrids. Even though he gardens in Canada, Dave is in the same zone 5b as we are. It will be a meeting not to be missed so mark your calendars! Next month’s newsletter will have more so stay tuned.…

Thank you to Rosemary Deen who lives near Kingston, NY, for sending us the following article. Please watch out for this invasive in your gardens.

Stiltgrass:
Barbarian at the Garden Gate

with a sprawling habit. It is a colonizing species that spreads quickly during the summer and fall. Individual plants may produce 100 to 1,000 seeds that drop in the late summer and germinate the following spring. Seed may be carried further by water currents during heavy rains or moved in with contaminated hay, soil, potted plants, construction fill, footwear and on the tires of vehicles. Stiltgrass seed remains viable in the soil for five years and germinates readily when hit by sunlight. When the plant dies it leaves a thick layer of thatch because the stems are slow to decompose and the density can suffocate other plants in its path. The seed itself is allelopathic which means it produces a chemical that suppresses the gemination of other types of seed, thus turning biodiverse areas into stiltgrass monocultures.

Where did it come from?:
It was sent to the US in the early 20th century in the form of packing material from Asia. The dried grass was used to pack imported dishes and household goods. It first showed up as a problem in Tennessee and has since spread across the US.


Stiltgrass: Barbarian at the Garden Gate


GARDEN JUDGES I WORKSHOP
– NOW ONLINE!

What is a Garden Judge?

Garden judges perform consistent and impartial evaluations of daylily performance in garden settings. Based on observations in their own region or a national convention, garden judges vote the AHS Awards and Honors ballot. Results of this voting focuses attention on daylilies which many garden judges consider outstanding garden performers in their regions. Garden Judges select the majority of AHS Cultivar Awards each year, including the Stout Silver Medal, AHS’s highest award given to a cultivar.

One class offering:
October 14 (7pm EST).
Free, online course for credit.

Must be an AHS member for 12 months prior to training. RSVP to:
judgeseducation@daylilies.org

Please note the date of the class you will be attending. The course will be offered via WebEx (an online conferencing tool) and private links to the meeting will be sent once eligibility is confirmed.

Why is it a problem?
An invasive plant is basically one that harms the eco-system in which it arrives. Stiltgrass is an ecological threat because it spreads to form dense extensive patches, thus displacing many other species that are not able to compete with it. Deer do not eat stiltgrass and by selectively feeding only on surrounding plants they help the stiltgrass become a monoculture. The interaction between stiltgrass and the Northern Pearly Eye (Enodia anthedon) butterfly is being studied because its caterpillar eats only native grasses. The butterfly was once common, but it’s been observed that their populations crash when stiltgrass enters the environment. Further investigation is being done to study the potential impacts of stiltgrass on grass dependent butterflies and other insects that might try to utilize stiltgrass as an alternative host plant.

Article by:
Catskill Native Nursery, 845-626-2758
607 Samsonville Rd, Kerhonkson NY 12446 |
Email:info@catskillnativenursery.com

We are getting many questions about this invasive grass that has been finding its way into Hudson Valley gardens. So here is some information to get you started about controlling it if you already have an infestation, or find yourself with one in the near future which is very likely…

What is it?
Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) is

How to ID it:
Along with its jointed stem you can easily tell stiltgrass from other grasses by the silver line that goes down the center of the blades. It’s very easy to see when the light hits it and you can see it in the photo I posted.

What can you do about it?…
Hand Pulling:
For the home gardener, the best method to get rid of stiltgrass is to pull it BEFORE it goes to seed. It is shallow rooted and easy to pull, especially after a rain. You do not want to compost it because if it has been there for more than a year it is likely that its prolific seed is still present in the soil clinging to the roots, thus giving it a chance to germinate in your compost. If the grass is well established it might take a few seasons of hand pulling to exhaust the seed bank. Pile the pulled grass in an area where you can watch it and make sure it doesn’t sprout any new grass or cover it with a tarp to prevent germination.


Stiltgrass: Barbarian at the Garden Gate cont.


What are the steps I need to follow to become a garden judge?

1) You must have been an AHS Member for at least 12 calendar months to begin training. (When you send in an application to become a judge at the end of your training, you must have been an AHS member for 24 calendar months.) **Eligibility will be determined before admitted.

2) * Very important: Before you take any workshops, read Chapters 1 and 2 of the Garden Judges’ Handbook Judging Daylilies in the Garden. Need the FREE PDF of the Garden Judges Handbook? Download it from the
Portal here:
www.daylilynetwork.org/page/GardenJudgesHome

3) Take Garden Judges Workshop I (approx. 2 hrs.) This is taught by instructors using a Power Point. Students must pass written, timed, open book, online exam with at least 70% to receive credit.

4) Take Garden Judges Workshop 2 (approx. 2 1/2 hrs.) This part of the class is taught in a garden, and students learn to evaluate registered cultivars and seedlings with accredited instructors. These workshops are offered at Regional Summer meetings and National meetings and at times, are sponsored by daylily clubs.

5) After completing both workshops, you must fill out and send an “Application for Appointment as a Garden Judge” to your RP (Regional President). Your RP will send the form to the Garden Judges Records chair, who will notify you of your appointment for a five-year term as a garden judge.

Mechanical Removal:
Stiltgrass can also be cut using a weed whacker, mower, or scythe from mid-August through September to prevent it from going to seed. Because stiltgrass is an annual, cutting LATE in the summer when you see the thin flower heads forming on the end of the stalks stops the seeding process and doesn’t give the plant enough time to regrow. Do not cut it earlier in the season because stiltgrass then responds by regrowing, flowering and dropping seed sooner than normal and it’s how people end up with a lawn full of short stiltgrass >>>>>>So the best prevention is a combination of hand pulling when it emerges followed by a timely cut back of larger populations.<<<<<

What Happens if the grass starts to go to seed?
If you miss getting the grass earlier and it starts to go to seed you can solarize it by pulling it and putting in a CLEAR plastic bag. Put the bag in the sun for a few days and it will get hot enough to kill the seed or any seedlings that start to germinate. Even then do not put this in a compost but rather make an area on your property where you can dump the cooked plant materials and keep the vegetation covered with a tarp until it breaks down completely.


Stiltgrass: Barbarian at the Garden Gate still cont.


6) Garden judges should grow a variety of cultivars of various forms and sizes in order to better learn to evaluate the “complete garden plant” and to become familiar with all types of daylilies. Particular attention should be given to growing a sampling of regionally hybridized cultivars. Judges should also visit as many gardens as possible during bloom season and to attend Regional and National meetings.

Whom do I contact for more information?
You may contact the Judges Education Chair
judgeseducation@daylilies.org

Ticket To Ride by Mussar, 2018

Mechanical Removal:
Stiltgrass can also be cut using a weed whacker, mower, or scythe from mid-August through September to prevent it from going to seed. Because stiltgrass is an annual, cutting LATE in the summer when you see the thin flower heads forming on the end of the stalks stops the seeding process and doesn’t give the plant enough time to regrow. Do not cut it earlier in the season because stiltgrass then responds by regrowing, flowering and dropping seed sooner than normal and it’s how people end up with a lawn full of short stiltgrass >>>>>>So the best prevention is a combination of hand pulling when it emerges followed by a timely cut back of larger populations.<<<<<

What Happens if the grass starts to go to seed?
If you miss getting the grass earlier and it starts to go to seed you can solarize it by pulling it and putting in a CLEAR plastic bag. Put the bag in the sun for a few days and it will get hot enough to kill the seed or any seedlings that start to germinate. Even then do not put this in a compost but rather make an area on your property where you can dump the cooked plant materials and keep the vegetation covered with a tarp until it breaks down completely.

Meagan and Graeme’s Big Surprise by Mussar, 2014


The BIG Annual Sale


2019 Calendar of Events

August 17th – Annual Sale
at Faddegon’s

September 21st – TBD

October 19th – TBD

November – TBD

December 14th
Holiday Party with UNYHS.

The Albany Co-Cooperative Ext.
is located at 24 Martin Road,
Voorheesville, NY. 12186.
Meetings begin at 10 am
unless otherwise noted.

The William K Sanford
Town Library is located at
629 Albany Shaker Rd,
Loudonville,NY 12211.

Daylily in the heading is
Coronal Mass Ejection
by Bachman, 2012

The daylily in the heading is
Book of Life by K. Emmerich, 2019

The BIG Annual Sale

Saturday, August 17th is our Annual Sale at Faddegon’s Nursery, 1140 Troy Schenectady Rd, Latham, NY. The sale is open to the public from 9 am to noon.

We have dug the daylilies and they are washed, divided into fans, bagged and labeled and ready for their big day. Setup begins at 7 am to put up pictures and lay out the bags. Members have early buying privileges before 8:30 am.

The list of daylilies available follows:

ALBERENE LITTLE AUDREY
ALMOND PUFF LOVE THOSE EYES
ALWAYS A PLEASURE MAN OF SORROWS
ALWAYS AFTERNOON MANDALAY BAY MUSIC
APRIL FOOLS MARISKA
ARIEL MASCARA SNAKE
AUGUST FROST MASK OF ZORRO
AUGUSTAN AGE MICRO CHIP
AUTUMN MINARET MILDRED BRADLEY
BELA LUGOSI MOON SNOW
BIG KISS MULBERRY STREET
BOLD TIGER MUSCLE AND BLOOD
BURNING HOT SPOT NO BLUE OXFORDS
BUTTER PECAN NOSFERATU
CAPE ROMAN HARBER OHIO SUNSET
CELESTIAL BEAUTY OLD KING COLE
CHEROKEE STAR ORANGE VELVET
CHERRY CANDY ORCHID CORSAGE
CHICKS DIG IT ORCHID CORSAGE
CLOWNING AROUND OUTRAGEOUS
CORINTHIAN PINK PAT NEWMAN