October Meeting


2019-20 Calendar
of Events

October 19th – daylily hybridizer Dave Mussar

10 am at Cooperative Extension offices

November 16th – TBD will be
held at Cooperative Extension
offices

December 14th
Holiday Party with UNYHS.

January 18th – 1:00 pm at
Library

February 16thSunday
Winter Doldrums Party

March 28th – Meeting at
Capital District Garden and
Flower Show

April 18th – TBD

May 9th

June 20th – Members’ Sale
and Distribution of Babysitters

July 11th – Picnic

August 15th – Big Annual Sale

September 19th – TBD

October 17th – TBD

The Albany Co-Cooperative Ext.
is located at 24 Martin Road,
Voorheesville, NY. 12186.
Meetings begin at 10 am
unless otherwise noted.

The William K Sanford
Town Library is located at
629 Albany Shaker Rd,
Loudonville,NY 12211.

Daylilies in the article are:
Kendra Marie by Mussar, 2015 and Joanne Meyer
by Mussar, 2014

The daylily in the article is:
Queen of Floof by Mussar, 2019

The daylily in the heading is:
Rocky Racoon by Mussar, 2019

October Meeting

The October meeting is Saturday, October 19th at 10 am at the Cooperative Extension offices on Martin Rd. in Voorheesville. We are very excited to have Dave Mussar coming from Canada to speak to us about his daylily hybridizing program and to give us a sneak peek at his new introductions for next year.

Dave has been seriously growing and breeding daylilies for 19 years. From the beginning his focus has been to develop a spotted daylily. That has expanded to include stripes and broken colors primarily at the tetraploid level. Dave has also done a lot of work with toothy daylilies using Brother Charles Reckamp cultivars as a starting base. He has also been working on tetraploid cristate forms based on his own daylily,
Kendra Marie.

In addition, Dave has tried his hand at conversions of diploid daylilies to tetraploid daylilies, which has taken him in several other directions. Dave has served as President of the Ontario Daylily Society for a number of years, chaired the annual Can Am Classic for a long time and served Region 4 as the Regional Publicity Director for several terms.

We can order daylilies for next year, but we should wait until Dave updates his website later this fall. Perhaps we can discuss doing a combined order or if people decide to go to the Can Am next May, we could coordinate a pickup there. You can see more of Dave’s daylilies on his website:
http://dave.mussar.com/

As our gardens wind down for the fall, it’s fun to anticipate next year’s daylily season. Come join us for a look into a daylily hybridizer’s life and work – bring a friend (we are always happy to have fellow enthusiasts join us). If you can, bring a dish to share or a donation for the door prize table.


October Meeting cont.


HADS OFFICERS

Co-Chairs – Bill Wurster
(518) 786-3105 and
Cindi Jones (518) 598-3366
wursterw@verizon.net
cindijones58@gmail.com

Secretary – Kathryn Mohrt
kemohrke@aol.com

Treasurer – Carol Volungus
(518) 383-0447
daylilly@juno.com

Committee Chairs
Programs – Speakers

Debi Chowdhury
debichowdhury@yahoo.com

Historian – vacant

Newsletter Editor
Stephanie Kronau
skronau@nycap.rr.com

Hospitality – Barbara Sander
and Don Constantino
bsander@nycap.rr.com

Sunshine – Debi Chowdhury
debichowdhury@yahoo.com

Babysitter Plants
Frank Almquist
falmquist@hvc.rr.com
and Sharon Gallucci
smgallucci@msn.com

Display Garden
Pat & Don Salhoff
psalhoff@verizon.net

Website – Janet Spychalski
Janet.Spychalski@its.ny.gov

Photographer – Cindi Jones
cindijones58@gmail.com

Membership – Carol Volungus
daylilly@juno.com
4 Applewood Dr.,
Rexford. NY 12148

Publicity – Cathy Fruhauf
cathyfruhauf@hotmail.com

Scholarship Chair
Cindy Jennings
CindyJenningsNY@aol.com

Daylilies in the article are:
A Hard Days Starry Night
by Mussar, 2019 and Give Peace
A Chance by Mussar, 2019

Co-Chair Corner
By Bill Wurster

I would like to let everybody know I will be stepping down as Co-Chair effective September 30, 2019. It has been my pleasure to serve as HADS Co-Chair along with Cindi Jones.

The contract for our meeting rooms at Cornell Cooperative Extension next year has been signed and our Treasurer will be returning the document along with payment. The Contract for the March Flower show has been completed and payment has been provided. The contract for the bus trip to the AHS Region 4 Conference has been completed and the payment was provided. At our September meeting a motion to establish a $1000 dollar scholarship like the one provided by The Hosta Society was approved. The application for the scholarship has been approved and will go out to schools for 2020. I have tried to complete all the duties needed to set the table for HADS 2020 season. October is the normal time to hold HADS election according to our bylaws.

I could not have done this for so many years without the help of the committees and volunteers who have helped every time there was a need.
Thank You!!!
Bill


Winter Outlook 2020


Frances Marie Cowieson by Mussar, 2019

Freckled Sunshine by Mussar, 2019

Daylilies in the article are:
Hello I Love You by Mussar, 2019
and I Am The Walrus by Mussar,
2019

Thanks to
Two Volunteers

Please welcome Kathryn Mohr who has volunteered to be the Secretary for our club. Also welcome Cindy Jennings who volunteered to be Scholarship Chair for HADS. Many thanks to both these women for their generosity in helping our club.

Don’s Daylily Divider

Don’s Daylily Divider is a very handy tool to have when you find yourself wrestling with large clumps of daylilies, trying in vain to get the fans to loosen their grip on each other and seeking for a way to get a tool into the clump without breaking off fans from their roots. The divider is two forked sections hinged together that open to work the daylily apart gently. You can order it from the website:
www.donsdaylilydivider.com
or see it in action on You Tube – search daylily divider.

Thanks to Frank Almquist for an early look
at a winter forecast….

JANUARY 2020

First few Some rain or snowshowers
1st wk Some snow then fair and cold
2nd wk Snow – Some Ice then wet
and milder
3rd wk Icy cold then moderating with
rain A.O snow
Last wk Bone Chilling Cold

FEBRUARY 2020

1st wk Snow showers followed by
a snow storm
2nd wk More snow and cold
then moderating – windy
3rd wk Party cloudy and cold
Last wk Fair – cold – chance of
a light wintry mix

MARCH 2020

1st wk Early rain then cold
with a late wintry mix
2nd wk Some rain then a larger
winter storm late
3rd wk Winter storm may
change to rain
4th wk Partly cloudy – seasonable

Summary: Intensifying cold late January into mid February. Cold spells with follow into mid March. Storms will be plenty . . .most of which will bring snow or a wintry mix.

New Year’s Day Some rain or snow showers
Martin Luther King Weekend Icy cold
Valentine’s Day Windy – chilly
President’s Day Weekend Fair – cold
St. Patrick’s Day Stormy


September Meeting


2019-20 Calendar of Events

September 21st – Daylilies 101 – presented by Frank Almquist
10 am at Cooperative Extension offices

October 19th – daylily hybridizer Dave Mussar

November 16th – TBD will be
held at Cooperative Extension
offices

December 14th
Holiday Party with UNYHS.

January 18th – 1:00 pm at
Library

February 16th – Sunday –
Winter Doldrums Party

March 28th – Meeting at
Capital District Garden and
Flower Show

April 18th – TBD

May 9 or 16th

June 13 or 20th

July 11th – Picnic

August 15th – Big Annual Sale

September 19th – TBD

October 17th – TBD

The Albany Co-Cooperative Ext.
is located at 24 Martin Road,
Voorheesville, NY. 12186.
Meetings begin at 10 am
unless otherwise noted.

The William K Sanford
Town Library is located at
629 Albany Shaker Rd,
Loudonville,NY 12211.

Daylilies in the article are:
Kendra Marie by Mussar, 2015 and Joanne Meyer by Mussar, 2014

The daylily in the heading is
Pink Viper by Mussar, 2014

September Meeting

So you bought bunches of daylilies at our August Sale and planted them in your garden…now what? Frank Almquist will present a Daylilies 101 program at our meeting in September that will answer all your questions on daylilies! Daylilies 101 will give you an in-depth look at daylilies – types, classifications, how they grow and how to take care of them (and what all those letters on the labels mean!).

Our meeting on September 21st will be held at 10 am at the Cooperative Extension offices on Martin Rd., in Voorheesville. Join us for a fun meeting and a look into the secret life of daylilies – bring a friend and a dish to share.

Frank Almquist and his wife, Peggy, are active members of HADS as well as being Master Gardeners in Ulster County for more than ten years. Frank retired from engineering and management positions at IBM in the summer of 1997. He has been active in gardening along with other volunteer activities ever since. Frank and Peggy garden and grow daylilies at their home in Kingston, NY. They have attended many regional and national daylily conventions as well as welcoming people into their garden which is registered as an official Display Garden with the American Hemerocallis Society (AHS).


Sneak Peek at the October Meeting


HADS OFFICERS

Co-Chairs – Bill Wurster
(518) 786-3105 and
Cindi Jones (518) 598-3366
wursterw@verizon.net
cindijones58@gmail.com

Secretary – vacant

Treasurer – Carol Volungus
(518) 383-0447
daylilly@juno.com

Committee Chairs
Programs – Speakers

Debi Chowdhury
debichowdhury@yahoo.com

Historian – vacant

Newsletter Editor
Stephanie Kronau
skronau@nycap.rr.com

Hospitality – Barbara Sander
and Don Constantino
bsander@nycap.rr.com

Sunshine – Debi Chowdhury
debichowdhury@yahoo.com

Babysitter Plants
Frank Almquist
falmquist@hvc.rr.com
and Sharon Gallucci
smgallucci@msn.com

Display Garden
Pat & Don Salhoff
psalhoff@verizon.net

Website – Janet Spychalski
Janet.Spychalski@its.ny.gov

Photographer – Cindi Jones
cindijones58@gmail.com

Membership – Carol Volungus
daylilly@juno.com
4 Applewood Dr.,
Rexford. NY 12148

Publicity – Cathy Fruhauf
cathyfruhauf@hotmail.com

Daylilies in the article are:
Cherry Stripes by Mussar, 2014 and
Dragon Nation by Mussar, 2014

Sneak Peek at the October Meeting

Dave Mussar is a daylily hybridizer in Guelph, Ontario. Next month Dave will be coming to tell us about his daylilies and what characteristics he tries to bring out in his hybrids. Even though he gardens in Canada, Dave is in the same zone 5b as we are. It will be a meeting not to be missed so mark your calendars! Next month’s newsletter will have more so stay tuned.…

Thank you to Rosemary Deen who lives near Kingston, NY, for sending us the following article. Please watch out for this invasive in your gardens.

Stiltgrass:
Barbarian at the Garden Gate

with a sprawling habit. It is a colonizing species that spreads quickly during the summer and fall. Individual plants may produce 100 to 1,000 seeds that drop in the late summer and germinate the following spring. Seed may be carried further by water currents during heavy rains or moved in with contaminated hay, soil, potted plants, construction fill, footwear and on the tires of vehicles. Stiltgrass seed remains viable in the soil for five years and germinates readily when hit by sunlight. When the plant dies it leaves a thick layer of thatch because the stems are slow to decompose and the density can suffocate other plants in its path. The seed itself is allelopathic which means it produces a chemical that suppresses the gemination of other types of seed, thus turning biodiverse areas into stiltgrass monocultures.

Where did it come from?:
It was sent to the US in the early 20th century in the form of packing material from Asia. The dried grass was used to pack imported dishes and household goods. It first showed up as a problem in Tennessee and has since spread across the US.


Stiltgrass: Barbarian at the Garden Gate


GARDEN JUDGES I WORKSHOP
– NOW ONLINE!

What is a Garden Judge?

Garden judges perform consistent and impartial evaluations of daylily performance in garden settings. Based on observations in their own region or a national convention, garden judges vote the AHS Awards and Honors ballot. Results of this voting focuses attention on daylilies which many garden judges consider outstanding garden performers in their regions. Garden Judges select the majority of AHS Cultivar Awards each year, including the Stout Silver Medal, AHS’s highest award given to a cultivar.

One class offering:
October 14 (7pm EST).
Free, online course for credit.

Must be an AHS member for 12 months prior to training. RSVP to:
judgeseducation@daylilies.org

Please note the date of the class you will be attending. The course will be offered via WebEx (an online conferencing tool) and private links to the meeting will be sent once eligibility is confirmed.

Why is it a problem?
An invasive plant is basically one that harms the eco-system in which it arrives. Stiltgrass is an ecological threat because it spreads to form dense extensive patches, thus displacing many other species that are not able to compete with it. Deer do not eat stiltgrass and by selectively feeding only on surrounding plants they help the stiltgrass become a monoculture. The interaction between stiltgrass and the Northern Pearly Eye (Enodia anthedon) butterfly is being studied because its caterpillar eats only native grasses. The butterfly was once common, but it’s been observed that their populations crash when stiltgrass enters the environment. Further investigation is being done to study the potential impacts of stiltgrass on grass dependent butterflies and other insects that might try to utilize stiltgrass as an alternative host plant.

Article by:
Catskill Native Nursery, 845-626-2758
607 Samsonville Rd, Kerhonkson NY 12446 |
Email:info@catskillnativenursery.com

We are getting many questions about this invasive grass that has been finding its way into Hudson Valley gardens. So here is some information to get you started about controlling it if you already have an infestation, or find yourself with one in the near future which is very likely…

What is it?
Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) is

How to ID it:
Along with its jointed stem you can easily tell stiltgrass from other grasses by the silver line that goes down the center of the blades. It’s very easy to see when the light hits it and you can see it in the photo I posted.

What can you do about it?…
Hand Pulling:
For the home gardener, the best method to get rid of stiltgrass is to pull it BEFORE it goes to seed. It is shallow rooted and easy to pull, especially after a rain. You do not want to compost it because if it has been there for more than a year it is likely that its prolific seed is still present in the soil clinging to the roots, thus giving it a chance to germinate in your compost. If the grass is well established it might take a few seasons of hand pulling to exhaust the seed bank. Pile the pulled grass in an area where you can watch it and make sure it doesn’t sprout any new grass or cover it with a tarp to prevent germination.